Tech

Customized search: Amazon should prefer its own products

The search algorithms from Amazon should be a report of the Wall Street Journals that they are better placed to value in-house products, which are more profitable for the company. It is not specified that these products are classified per se higher because they are their own. However, the search criteria are set according to the products.

The Wall Street Journal invokes in his report on former employees of a team responsible for the search engine. They are said to have been under pressure from management to ensure that their own brands appear higher up in the results lists than third-party products.

Amazon has long been in the focus of competitive research, as the company is both a marketplace and a manufacturer. Competitors must not be disadvantaged on the platform. With the repeatedly made changes in the settings of the search criteria, Amazon actually refutes the allegations. And the new allegations are denied.

The allegations are wrong, according to an Amazon spokeswoman: "We have made no changes to the criteria for search results, which include profitability." There is not one measure, but a multitude of values, which are used in the evaluation of new functions. Customers get what they want, regardless of their own brands or partners.

US regulators are already looking at Amazon's dealer platform Marketplace. It is about the question of discrimination of traders. There are also competition assessments in Europe. The European Commission is investigating whether Amazon, as operator, uses data from the platform in order to gain an advantage over others.

In its 25th year, the platform is by far the most successful online retailer, and its market power is correspondingly large. According to the Handelsinstitut IFH influences Amazon's purchases also on other platforms, because it has become such an important product search engine and source of information. The chairman of the German Monopolies Commission therefore spoke about a possible unbundling.

. (TagsToTranslate) algorithms (t) Amazon (t) EU (t) competition law