Tech

My Games Store: Mail.ru opens PC download shop in Western markets

So far, the Russian online company Mail.ru distributes the games of its gaming offshoot My.com on Steam – such as Conquerer's Blade and Warface. Now the company intends to open its download shop, which was previously available in Eastern European markets, in the West, under the name My Games Store. The start is scheduled for the fourth quarter of 2019. Developers and publishers can offer both free-to-play and full-price games through the shop.

Job market

  1. VBL. Supply institute of the federation and the countries, Karlsruhe
  2. THD – Technical College Deggendorf, Deggendorf



One of the important metrics for such stores is the amount of commission that operators withhold. My Games Store wants 30 percent of the sales proceeds, the remaining 70 percent is given to the respective developer or publisher of the game. This should make it difficult to get really interesting titles, because the main competitor shops work with lower shares.

While the provider of a game in the Epic Games Store gets 88 percent of the sales revenue for each sale, Steam accounts for 70 to 80 percent depending on sales – the vast majority of small and medium-sized developer studios receive only the lower share. However, Steam offers a sophisticated platform, good service and, above all, a huge customer base. At least with the latter, My Games Store can certainly not catch up with the biggest effort at first.

The company wants to win customers with a feature called Lootdog, among other things, with the player "safe to trade with in-game items for real money" should be able to. In addition, you should be able to reward streamer directly on the platform with donations – the idea is probably that Let's Player in this way make as much free advertising for the site.

In addition to Steam and the Epic Games Store, there are other PC game shops, such as the chat provider Discord or Gog.com – behind the developer studio CD Project RED (Cyberpunk 2077). In addition, Electronic Arts, Ubisoft and Blizzard own portals through which they sell the PC versions of their games.