Tech

Retro LEDs in comparison: Philips Hue, Elesion & Hama


Smart Edison bulbs with connection to Alexa and Google Assistant provide warm retro-style light at home. We have models from Elesion (Pearl), Hama and Philips verglichen.

Smart bulbs provide atmospheric lighting effects for at home (guide) or in the garden (comparison). Since autumn there have also been smart vintage LEDs in the range of many manufacturers. We tried products from Hama, Philips and Pearl.

What makes these LEDs so special is their look. They imitate the appearance of old filament or Edison bulbs and bring the retro illuminants back into the presence of voice assistants and LEDs. We explain more about the background in our buying advice: 5 vintage LEDs for the smart home.

Overview of LEDs:
Specs / models Philips Hue E27 Edison Elesion LAV-125.w Elesion LAV-150.t Elesion LAV-150.w Hama WiFi LED
watt

7 watts

5 watts

7 watts

7 watts

7 watts

lumen

600 lumens

400 lumens

800 lumens

800 lumens

800 lumens

Kelvin

2,000 Kelvin

2,200 Kelvin

6,500 Kelvin

2,700 Kelvin

2,700 Kelvin

color temperature

warm white

warm white

daylight white

warm white

warm white

useful life

25,000 hours

15,000 hours

15,000 hours

15,000 hours

15,000 hours

Infinitely dimmable

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

app

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Bluetooth

Yes

No

No

No

No

Connection to
Smart home

Amazon, Apple, Google, Hue Bridge

Amazon, Google, WiFi

Amazon, Google, WiFi

Amazon, Google, WiFi

Amazon, Google, WiFi

Philips Hue (review) has three models for the retro smart home on offer – the Hue White E27 Edison, E27 Classic and E27 Globe. All three models work with both Bluetooth and Zigbee and can be controlled via app or voice. Our test model, the Edison E27, is available for around 21 euros and is characterized by the classic form factor of an Edison bulb: a drop-like design of the lamp.



From left to right: Hama WiFi LED, Elesion LAV-150.t, LAV-150.w, LAV-125.w, Philips Hue Edison

According to the manufacturer, the LED runs with a recording of 7 watts at 550 lumens in a warm white with a color temperature of 2000 Kelvin. With a service life of around 25,000 hours, the lamp also has the longest lifespan, according to Philips.

There are two ways to set up the Philips LED. If you can get by with up to ten of the smart light bulbs, you can connect the new generation of Hue lamps directly to your smartphone via Bluetooth. Up to 50 lamps are possible via the separately available Hue Bridge, which connects via Zigbee instead of Bluetooth. It is also a prerequisite for the connection with the voice assistants Amazon Alexa and Google Home.

The Hue Edison LED can be dimmed continuously from bright daylight to dim night light. In terms of color temperature, however, we were somewhat disappointed in the test. The manufacturer describes the LED as warm white, but in practice it always seemed a bit too bright and could not match the slightly copper-colored tone of a classic Edison bulb. Unfortunately, the color cannot be adjusted via the app, only the brightness can be regulated.

At around 15 euros, the Elesion LAV-125.w is the most expensive model of LEDs from the mail order company Pearl. For the facility that will also Elesion called app for Android and iOS. Compared to the Philips model, the Edison LED from Pearl connects directly to the WLAN and works without a bridge. In theory, lamps connect to the home network indefinitely. Compared to radio standards such as Zigbee or Z-Wave, the WLAN connection uses more energy.



The Elesion LAV-125.w offers a warm light with a retro look

According to the data sheet, the LAV-125.w requires 5 watts and, at 400 lumens, is not quite as bright as the Philips model. With 2200 Kelvin, it also brings a cozy warm white into the rooms. This does not illuminate a room, but that is enough for an additional light source or for use as a decorative lamp – and this is ultimately the primary area of ​​application for vintage LEDs.



Not pretty, but functional – the app of the Elesion LEDs

The LED is quickly set up: after downloading the app, the user selects the button from the menu lighting and then to the menu item Led lamp, Now you are asked to turn on the LED. It flickers continuously, signaling that it is ready to pair. Then press the button in the app To confirm, type in his WiFi password and the setup is done.

In terms of functionality, the model LAV-125.w offers the same as the Hue LED. The lamp is infinitely dimmable and also offers a choice of scenes – such as heavily dimmed as a night lamp from 10 p.m.

If you still want to connect your LED to Alexa or Google Assistant, go to the corresponding voice assistant app and follow the normal setup procedure. The Elesion LED is then linked to the smart home and can be assigned to scenes or groups – "Alexa, switch on relaxed light".

The Elesion LAV-150.t is priced at 13 euros. Setup and range of functions are the same as the LAV-125.w. The pears still distinguish a few subtleties: According to the manufacturer, the 150th t is 800 instead of 400 lumens and 6500 instead of 2200 Kelvin and is significantly lighter. With 7 watts, it also consumes a little more electricity.

Accordingly, this LED also shines colder, i.e. bluish. She does this very well, but the buyer must be aware that it is not a classic Edison LED with warm light, but a filament LED with cold white light.



The LAV-150.t from the Pearl brand does not convince with its cool white light in a retro comparison, but is the brightest LED in comparison

The LAV-150.w is also the last model in the Pearl range for smart Edison LEDs at around 13 euros. Visually the same as the 150th t, the 150th w uses warm white with 2700 Kelvin. Otherwise, the models are identical, are 7 watts and 800 lumens.

In terms of the sense of light, the 150th w comes very close to the 125th w. Both radiate a nice warm white and come very close to the originals with filament. The 150.w is a little cheaper, which is probably due to the classic shape of a light bulb. If you prefer the form factor of an Edison replica, you should rather look at the 125.w.



The LAV-150.w offers average retro light, but is the cheapest LED.

Hama has an Edison LED with fiber optic for 19 euros. According to the manufacturer, the bulb called WiFI LED offers a warm white light with 2700 Kelvin and is in line with the other models with 7 watts and 800 lumens. The Hama-LED uses the same app as the Pearl models – both manufacturers seem to have saved costs here. Nevertheless, setup at Hama is very easy via the app. As soon as the LED is connected to power, the bulb flashes and is ready for pairing with the smartphone. When this process is complete, the Hama model also connects to Alexa or Google Assistant.



The Hama LED comes very close to the Elesion LAV-150.w in terms of light and optics

We found the light of the Hama to be less warm in the test, such as the Philips Hue or the Elesion LAV-125.w. The Hama LED is infinitely dimmable and offers good brightness at 100 percent. At 10 percent power, quasi in Edison mode, it is still too bright and provides a light yellow, somewhat uncomfortable light.

With regard to the nominal power, the Elesion bulbs in our measurements are within the specified value of 7 or 5 watts at 100 percent luminosity. In typical use – i.e. dimmed light with 10 percent output – they average 0.9 or 1.5 watts. A good value for a decorative pear. The WLAN LED from Hama draws 1.2 watts at 10 percent power and 6.8 watts at 100 percent power. This is by far the worst value in comparison to all the lamps tested.



The Elesion LEDs have only 1.5 watts in dimmed light

The power requirement shows that Philips cannot be fooled much in terms of experience with lamps. The nominal power of the Philips LED is 7 watts, in practice 6.6 watts with 100 percent power and 0.5 watts with 10 percent power. Thus, the hue is a little more economical than the Elesion at 10 percent, but also a little less bright.



The Hue Edison is also below the nominal power of 7 watts



Philips Hue White E27 7W / 821 ST64 (688868-00)

Philips Hue E27 Edison

Luminea ZX-2982-944 Home Control LED Bulb E27 5W / 822

Elesion LAV-125.w

(No product picture available)

Elesion LAV-150.w

(No product picture available)

Elesion LAV-150.t

Hama WiFi Filament LED Bulb 7W / 827 E27 (176555)

Hama WiFi LED


The models of the Elesion brands from Pearl and Hama are exciting competitors to the established Hue lamps on the vintage LED market. All illuminants do their job without compromise – the setup is comfortable, the connection to voice assistants is effortless and the light of the LEDs almost corresponds to the model, the Edison light bulb.

However, Philips offers the most connection options with the Hue E27. The models from Elesion and Hama rely on WLAN according to 802.11b / g / n, which works in the 2.4 GHz band and is already full in many households – most WLANs transmit at 2.4 GHz and are overloaded accordingly. This can lead to failures in the operation of the lamps. Philips, on the other hand, uses Bluetooth or Zigbee as standards. The latter also mostly uses the 2.4 GHz band, but also relies on a modulated transmission signal, which makes the transmission significantly less interference.

The functionality of Philips, Hama and Elesion apps is the same. Hama and Elesion rely on a visually unappealing app, but both solutions control LEDs individually or in groups, both of which offer the option of grouping several LEDs. In conjunction with a voice assistant, however, this is no longer necessary – because there all compatible LEDs can be controlled centrally, regardless of whether Philips, Hama, Elesion, Xiaomi or other manufacturers.

In terms of color temperature, we believe the Hue E27 Edison from Philips is in front, closely followed by the LAV-125.w from the Pearl Shop and the Hama WiFi LED. The Hue offers – even if it is only nuances – the warmest light at all levels and comes closest to the original with filament. Individual authentic Edison lamps with filament are of course still on the market, but not in smart.

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